Wind Ensemble

2019 Concert MPA Resource Recordings

Bonnie Eloise March” by Thomas/Koerner

Make Our Garden Grow” by Bernstein/Kreines

El Camino Real” by Reed/Longfield

Extra Resources

Bonnie Eloise” original folk song by Mitch Miller

Bonny Eloise” (C.W. Elliot / J. R. Thomas) Another Folksong Version

O, sweet is the vale where the Mohawk gently glides On its clear winding way to the sea, And dearer than all storied streams on earth beside Is this bright rolling river to me;

But sweeter, dearer, yes, dearer far than these, Who charms where others all fail, Is my blue-eyed, Bonny, Bonny Eloise, The Belle of the Mohawk Vale.

O, sweet are the moments when dreaming I roam, Thro’ my loved haunts now mossy and grey, And dearer than all is my childhood’s hallow’d home That is crumb’ling now slowly away;

Make Our Garden Grow” from the comedic operetta “Candide”

You’ve been a fool and so have I
But come I’ll be your wife
And let us try before we die
To make some sense of life
We’re neither pure nor wise nor good
We’ll do the best we know
We’ll build our house and chop our wood
And make our garden grow
And make our garden grow

I thought the world was sugar cake
For so our master said
But now I’ll teach my hands to bake
Our loaf of daily bread
We’re neither pure nor wise nor good
We’ll do the best we know
We’ll build house and chop our wood
And make our garden grow
And make our garden grow

Let dreamers dream what worlds they please
Those edens can’t be found
The sweetest flowers
The fairest trees
Are grown in solid ground
We’re neither pure nor wise nor good
We’ll do the best we know
We’ll build our house and chop our wood
And make our garden grow
And make our garden grow

El Camino Real” by Reed Original Composition

El Camino Real (literally “The Royal Road” or “The King’s Highway”) was commissioned by, and is dedicated to, the 581st Air Force Band (AFRES) and its Commander, Lt. Col. Ray E. Toler. Composed during the latter half of 1984 and completed in early ’85, it bears the subtitle: “A Latin Fantasy.”

The music is based on a series of chord progressions common to countless generations of Spanish flamenco (and other) guitarists, whose fiery style and brilliant playing have captivated millions of music lovers throughout the world. These progressions and the resulting key relationships have become practically synonymous with what we feel to be the true Spanish idiom. Together with the folk melodies they have underscored, in part derived by a procedure known to musicians as the “melodizing of harmony,” they have created a vast body of what most people would consider authentic Spanish music.

The first section of the music is based upon the dance form known as the Jota, while the second, contrasting section is derived from the Fandango, but here altered considerably in both time and tempo from its usual form. Overall, the music follows a traditional three-part pattern: fast-slow-fast.

The first public performance of El Camino Real took place on April 15th, 1985 in Sarasota, Florida, with the 581st Air Force Band under the direction of Lt. Col. Ray E. Toler.